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Friday, June 6, 2008

When the Telephone Poles Vanish

I dreamed that all the telephone poles got neatly uprooted in a nation-wide public works project. They are an eyesore.

In a poem I wrote in '75, I said

"(...)
the electric poles there
all connected
all sure:
one switch could blow us all up."

Solar photovoltaic electricity, directly had from sunlight (and incandescent lightbulbs), is like photosynthesis, which grows all of earth's trees and plants; why not let the sun grow all of the earth's fuel?

The United States government in 2004 classified photovoltaic energy producing as an agricultural process, under therefore the jurisdiction of the Department of Agriculture.

All other fuel sources are inferior to electricity. Only wind is competitive with solar photovoltaics, but it is unrelieable and more expensive , since it relies on intermittant air flows and machinery that contains many ridicoulously numerous moving parts.

As a means of powering manufacturing plants to produce solar panels ("modules" they seem to insist upon calling them in the trade), wind turbines would be great, as solar panels will be great to produce hydrogen, and to charge advanced batteies to propell transportation means.

In the 1950s electric train sets, and in the 1980s electric car racetrack sets for the children, were all the rage. Little electric cars for "tiny tots" to ride also.

The 1990s brought us wireless racing electric vehicles, many as large as a foot long and fast as lightning.

How in the world were these amazing machines able to work? Alas, the scientists and enginners have forgotten how to make them!

Will YOU save the planet from the dark and dingy confines of your garage workshop? Umm...yep! With a little help from our friends, no doubt.

Y'al be good now!

___________
Sincerely.
The International Solar Energy Conspiracy

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Charles Bukowski, My Poetic Tutor's Mentor and Friend

Charles Bukowski, My Poetic Tutor's Mentor and Friend
Buk's hillarious working man's Christmas is in his novel, Post Office